Hiring the Right DSLR Lens: The Basics

Hiring the Right DSLR Lens: The Basics

If you just got your hands on a new DSLR camera, it’s a good idea to consider hiring the right DSLR lens kit if you aim to get the most out of your recent acquisition.  The regular zoom lens that came with the camera can deliver in specific applications but won’t in others. Lenses are not really bastions of versatility, but can and will perform perfectly when used for its intended purpose. Let’s talk about the different lenses out there and find out which one you will need.

Lenses 101

Lenses have the most boring names, but are very straightforward as it tells you its purpose right off. Thus, understanding some basic terms and ideas surrounding lenses would be a good place to start. So let’s learn more about how lenses get their labels and what the labels actually stand for.

Prime vs. Zoom Lenses

Know the difference between prime and zoom lenses. Zoom lens do just that, zoom in and out to magnify your subject. Prime lenses won’t allow you zoom unless you move physically towards or away from the subject. With zoom lenses, simply turning the focus ring will do the job.

 

Zeiss 16MM ULTRAPRIME
Zeiss 16MM ULTRAPRIME

On the other hand, prime lenses will allow you to capture sharper images, perform better in low light (aperture), and cost a lot less than zoom lenses. Although newer zoom lenses have improved in terms of capturing better looking images, prime lenses can still perform intended functions better than zoom lenses.  The only problem with primes is the need to switch to zoom lenses when it is critical to do so.

 

 

CANON CN7X17 17-120MM T2.95 ZOOM LENS
CANON CN7X17 17-120MM T2.95 ZOOM LENS

Prime and zoom lenses are differentiated by their respective focal lengths. Measured in millimeters, focal length defines the distance between the image sensor and the lens when a subject is in focus. What beginners should need to remember about focal length is that lower numbers mean a wider view, thus larger numbers mean closer views.

Now,  it only follows that primes just have one focal length (35mm, 50mm, etc.), while zoom lenses have range and would appear . A 18-55mm zoom lens would have an 18mm-wide focal length, and as close as up to 55mm.

Aperture

The second measurement used for lenses is aperture. This would determine the amount of light the lens can let in. A lens with a wide aperture, would show something like this f-stop such as f/18, and able is able to take in more light. A narrow aperture would then show a larger number such as f/56, and captures less light. Keep in mind that a wide aperture will let you capture photos in lower light conditions.

When more of the image needs to be in focus, say a landscape, a higher aperture is needed. In contrast, wider apertures allows you focus on a smaller subject and blur away objects in the background.

Types of Lenses

Fisheye – are the widest lenses (12mm and lower). Used in capturing practically everything in view or an extremely exaggerated depth is needed. Looking through a door’s peephole will give you the the exact effect.

 

A fisheye shot
A fisheye shot

 

Wide angle -these are 18-30mm lenses for lesser exaggerated depths. Go for wide angle lenses when you need more detail capturing multiple subjects in your photo. Note that image distortion will still be present, but can be easily corrected as needed.

A Wide angle shot
A Wide angle shot

Standard lenses – 35-85mm lenses that imitates what the naked eye can see. Use these lenses for natural-looking shots. This lens range is the least expensive prime lenses, particularly the 50mm.

 

Image captured with standard lens
Image captured with standard lens

Telephoto lens – 100 -300mm’s that allows you to zoom in and isolate far away objects. Be sure to get telephoto lenses with optical stabilization.

 

A dramatic telephoto shot image of the moon.
A dramatic telephoto shot image of the moon.

Super telephoto lens – 300mm’s and higher lenses that can actually shoot very distant objects, such as the moon. Gives a nice effect even if you’re not shooting not-too far away objects.

 

A supertelephoto lens in action
A supertelephoto lens in action

Macros – allows you to zoom in incredibly close to a subject, and sometimes even closer to what our eyes can do.

 

A gorgeous example of macro shot photography
A gorgeous example of macro shot photography

Tilt-shift – lets the user focus on a specific area in the image and create a cool miniaturized effect.

 

Note that the train looks more like a miniature set than a real one wit telephoto lens.
Note that the train looks more like a miniature set than a real one with telephoto lens.

Aimimage offers a wide array zooms and primes that will suit both professional and amateur photographers alike. You don’t need to spend a fortune just so you can get that look and feel in your photograph.

Want to know more about our camera lens hire and other professional camera equipment rental services, please don’t hesitate to give us a call at 020 7391 2650. We definitely look forward to hearing from you.

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